Home General
Hey folks - as a member of the DawgNation community, please remember to abide by simple rules of civil engagement with other members:

- Please no inappropriate usernames (remember that there may be youngsters in the room)

- Personal attacks on other community members are unacceptable, practice the good manners your mama taught you when engaging with fellow Dawg fans

- Use common sense and respect personal differences in the community: sexual and other inappropriate language or imagery, political rants and belittling the opinions of others will get your posts deleted and result in warnings and/ or banning from the forum

- 3/17/19 UPDATE -- We've updated the permissions for our "Football" and "Commit to the G" recruiting message boards. We aim to be the best free board out there and that has not changed. We do now ask that all of you good people register as a member of our forum in order to see the sugar that is falling from our skies, so to speak.

NATIONAL TIE ONE ON DAY /NATIONAL SARDINES DAY

donmedeirosdonmedeiros Posts: 3,183 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

NATIONAL TIE ONE ON DAY

National Tie One on Day might confuse people with its name. However, it is not at all about going out, getting crazy, and drinking too much while others are at home, working hard preparing for tomorrow’s big Thanksgiving Day meal.

The day celebrates the apron as well as the past generations of women who wore them and it was also created as a day to bring joy to the life of someone in need and celebrate the spirit of giving.

“Women clad in aprons have traditionally prepared the Thanksgiving meal, and it is within our historical linkage to share our bounty.” EllynAnne Geisel

Through the years, aprons have served many purposes. They’ve protected hands from hot items coming out of the oven. In a moment of sadness, they’ve wiped tears away. Generation after generation, they protect our clothes while we cook. Though, they also protect shy, young children as they hide from strangers. During moments of haste or even humor, they handily swat away unwelcome kitchen visitors (cats, flies or cookie snatchers). They’ve carried eggs, vegetables, toys, and even the catch of the day. Aprons fan us as we wait for cakes to finish cooking and on cool mornings, they’ve warmed hands waiting for children at the bus stop or for the postman. Occasionally, they even make us feel a little more adept in the kitchen, too. 

As part of National Tie One on Day, buy an apron, bake something, tuck a note of encouragement in the pocket of the apron (or pin it on it). Wrap the baked good in the apron and give it to someone in need on Thanksgiving Eve.

Used in a sentence: Saturday

NATIONAL SARDINES DAY

November 24th recognizes these silver little fishes on National Sardines Day. They may not swim right up to your plate, but they sure do pack in the flavor. 

While some people are afraid to taste these small, silver fish, others consider sardines a delicious snack enjoyed on their own or with crackers.

Sardines are several types of small, oily fish, related to herrings. While we might be most familiar with sardines packed in cans, some enjoy fresh sardines grilled. This small fish can also be pickled and smoked, too. When canned, they can be packed in water, olive, sunflower or soybean oil or tomato, chili or mustard sauce.

The term sardine was first used in English during the beginning of the 15th century, possibly coming from the Mediterranean island of Sardinia where there was an abundance of sardines.

Sardines are a great source of vitamins and minerals.

From one’s daily vitamin allowance containing:

  • 13 % B2
  • .25 % niacin
  • 150% vitamin B12
  • phosphorus
  • calcium
  • potassium
  • iron
  • selenium
  • omega-3fatty acids
  • vitamin D
  • protein

– B vitamins are important in helping to support proper nervous system function and are used for energy metabolism.

– Omega 3 fatty acids reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular disease and regular consumption may reduce the likelihood of developing Alzheimer’s disease and can even boost brain function as well as help lower blood sugar levels.

Relative to other fish commonly eaten by humans, sardines are very low in contaminants, such as mercury.

Sardine oil is used in the manufacturing of paint, varnish and linoleum.

The sardine canning industry peaked in the United States in the 1950s. The Stinson Seafood plant in Prospect Harbor, Maine, which was the last large sardine cannery in the United States, closed its doors on April 15, 2010, after 135 years in operation.

  • Try sardines on a salad. Mash them up and mix them with some Caesar dressing for a start. Add some extra croutons if that improves the experience.
  • Toss them with pasta and a spicy marinara sauce.
  • Grill them with olive oil. Add lemon, garlic, and tarragon.

Used in a sentence: UGA fans will be packed like a can of sardines at Tech on Saturday.

Comments

Sign In or Register to comment.