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NATIONAL GRAPE POPSICLE DAY / NATIONAL COOLER DAY / NATIONAL CELLOPHANE TAPE DAY

donniemdonniem Posts: 488 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

Hot weather is here. What can one do about it? Well...did you ever wonder where the cool treat of a popsicle came from? Wonder no more.

NATIONAL GRAPE POPSICLE DAY

Since summer is just around the corner, May 27th calls for warm weather, sunshine, and National Grape Popsicle Day.

In San Francisco, California, in 1905, 11-yr-old Frank Epperson was outside on his porch, mixing water with a white powdered flavoring to make soda. Upon going inside, he left it there on the porch with the stirring stick still in it. That night the temperature reached a record low and the following morning, Frank discovered the drink had frozen to the stick.

Years later, in 1922, Epperson introduced his treat at a fireman’s ball where it was a huge success. Then in 1923, he made and sold his frozen treat-on-a-stick at an amusement park in Alameda, California. Epperson applied for a patent in 1924 for his frozen confectionery, which he called “Epsicle” ice pop. He then renamed it “Popsicle“.

Popsicles are one of summertime’s favorite treats for kids of all ages. National Grape Popsicle Day honors one of the most popular flavors!

HOW TO OBSERVE Grape Popsicle Day

Make some homemade grape popsicles or pick up your favorite frozen grape treat. We even have a grape…great One Ingredient Grape Popsicle Recipe from our National Day Calendar Ambassadors, the Erratic Divas. One way to enjoy your popsicle without the mess is by adding it to a clear soda. Pour the soda into a glass and then just add your popsicle to your soda. Not only does it keep your drink cool, but it also adds a bright color to your beverage. As the popsicle begins to melt, break it up like a slushy. What other ways do you enjoy your popsicles?

We can't let those popsicles melt now, can we? So, enter the cooler. Ever wonder where coolers came from ? Do you have a favorite type of cooler?

NATIONAL COOLER DAY

What more could you need than a cold drink for the official launch of summer? Something to keep it cold, of course! National Cooler Day, the Friday before Memorial Day, makes staying cool easy this summer.

#NationalCoolerDay

As simple as the design of a cooler may seem, it wasn’t until the 1950s that the first cooler or “portable icebox” made the scene. In fact, the material needed to make coolers didn’t even exist until 1944.

While we rely on coolers today to keep our food and beverages cold for various outdoor activities – they do so much more. Coolers save lives during disasters by carrying food (cold or hot) to areas affected by loss of power. Sporting events, fundraisers, and parades run more smoothly when volunteers bring their coolers along. They also keep medications at the proper temperature during shipping.

Of course, the combination of durable portability makes the cooler an essential tool in many ways. It is our spare seat, prep station, and umbrella anchor, too. Despite the wear and tear endured, they faithfully provide us with an ice-cold drink on a hot day – until the beverages run out.

Finally, have you ever wondered about cellophane tape and where it came from? If you are like me, probably not. Nevertheless, FYI:

NATIONAL CELLOPHANE TAPE DAY

It could be a sticky situation on May 27th as we recognize National Cellophane Tape Day. Can you imagine where we would be without this invention? Wrapping presents would be slightly more difficult without it.

#CellophaneTapeDay

Also known as invisible tape or Scotch Tape, this innovation can be found in every household and office. Richard Gurley Drew (June 22, 1899 – December 14, 1980) invented the invisible tape in 1930. He created the tape from cellulose and originally called it cellulose tape. His career started at the 3M company in 1920 in St. Paul, Minnesota where he developed a masking tape for the automotive industry in 1925.

Originally designed to seal Cellophane packages sold in groceries and bakeries, the new adhesive missed its mark. By the time all its drawbacks were resolved, DuPont introduced heat-sealed cellophane. However, the Cellophane packaging still offered some benefits.

With a resounding endorsement from customers, 3M found a market in both the home and the office. Many of us keep several rolls of it, too. Check the closet with the wrapping paper for a roll or two. There will be another in the junk drawer. Count another on the desk, perhaps. In offices and schools, teachers and employees stash the tape in large quantities.

Hard to count all of the uses for cellophane tape. Not sure where the term "scotch tape" came from - wonder if it is a reference to a stereotype of the Scots being "not wasteful". At any rate, life would be different without it.



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