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National Blame Someone Else Day / Uncle Sam Day

donmdonm Posts: 10,241 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

Well, here's your chance. Got a beef? Here's your chance to blame someone else. Maybe CMR? Maybe a favorite board member? Maybe a political figure? All's fair for this one day as long as you don't take the blame. Let 'er rip!

It's mom and pop Fromm's fault we aren't getting more passing yards. They provided the genes for Jake's small hands. /s of course.

On September 13, the United States recognizes Uncle Sam Day in commemoration of the man behind the iconic image. The fascinating nickname for the United States government was born on September 13, 1766.

Sam Wilson, a meatpacker from New York, supplied barrels of meat to soldiers during the war of 1812. To identify the meat for shipment, Wilson prominently stamped “U.S.” on the barrels. It wasn’t long before the soldiers dubbed the grub a delivery from Uncle Sam. As such nicknames tend to do, its popularity spread.

The first illustration of Uncle Sam is unlike the one we know today. Published by Harper’s Weekly in 1861, the young government representative (a starred bandana on his head and wearing a striped vest) is depicted dividing up Virginia like a butcher. Through the years, the image of Uncle Sam would take many forms.

Credit is given to German-born illustrator and cartoonist Thomas Nast for developing the long-legged Uncle Sam we know today. With the starred top hat and striped pants, the Uncle Sam debut in Harper’s Weekly, also. He took on many issues with Nast as his illustrator. Some of the issues topics included Boss Tweed, Union recruitment, and Reconstruction.

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