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National Louisiana Day / National Scrapple Day

donmdonm Posts: 10,241 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

Well, I guess I'll have to pick the Tigers today in their matchup with the Tide. Or will the Tide play the role of spoilers and ruin the Tigers' National Day. Hmm.

National Scrapple Day

National Scrapple Day on November 9th recognizes the first pork food invented in America. For those who are not familiar with scrapple, which is also known by the Pennsylvania Dutch name “pon haus,“ it is traditionally a mush of pork scraps and trimmings combined with cornmeal, wheat flour, and spices. (The spices may include but are not limited to sage, thyme, savory and black pepper.) The mush is then formed into a semi-solid loaf, sliced and pan-fried.

The immediate ancestor of scrapple was the Low German dish called panhas. It was adapted to make use of locally available ingredients. In parts of Pennsylvania, it is still called Pannhaas, panhoss, ponhoss or pannhas.

During the 17th and 18th centuries, German colonists who settled near Philadelphia and Chester County, Pennsylvania developed the first recipes for scrapple. Since the origin of its discovery, it is strongly associated with rural areas surrounding Philadelphia, Baltimore, Washington D.C., eastern Pennsylvania, New Jersey, Maryland, Delaware, eastern Virginia, and the Delmarva Peninsula.

  • Supermarkets offer scrapple throughout the regions in both refrigerated and frozen cases.
  • Home recipes for beef, chicken and turkey scrapple are available.
  • Scrapple is sometimes deep-fried or broiled instead of pan-frying.
  • Scrapple is typically eaten as a breakfast side dish.
  • Condiments are sometimes served with scrapple, some of which include apple butter, ketchup, jelly, maple syrup, honey, horseradish or mustard.

Nice pre-game meal?

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