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Josh Rosen Comments

Acrum21Acrum21 Posts: 2,436 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

http://www.latimes.com/sports/ucla/la-sp-josh-rosen-20170808-story.html

Not sure if everyone has read the article but I was curious what y'all thought about it. I can see both sides of the coin because I've experienced the hours of a student athlete and there is something to be said about "keeping players eligible". But at the same time there are guys out there graduating early. I think college athletics give kids wonderful opportunities and a great platform that otherwise wouldn't be available. But in the instance of the UCF kicker, I think the NCAA has too much of a strong arm policing kids personal brands and what they create for themselves. Just wondering where y'all stand on it.

Comments

  • KingoftheSouthKingoftheSouth Posts: 570 ✭✭✭✭ Senior

    Please read the article before anyone comments. There's a lot of cherry picking of quotes going on today with this interview.

    I honestly don't have any problem with what he said and thing he made some very valid points about the football institutions.

  • Acrum21Acrum21 Posts: 2,436 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @KingoftheSouth said:
    Please read the article before anyone comments. There's a lot of cherry picking of quotes going on today with this interview.

    I honestly don't have any problem with what he said and thing he made some very valid points about the football institutions.

    I agree to a certain extent. Look at Josh Dobbs, he has an aerospace engineering degree. And I know he probably put in more hours than any player at UT.

  • KingoftheSouthKingoftheSouth Posts: 570 ✭✭✭✭ Senior

    @Acrum21 said:

    @KingoftheSouth said:
    Please read the article before anyone comments. There's a lot of cherry picking of quotes going on today with this interview.

    I honestly don't have any problem with what he said and thing he made some very valid points about the football institutions.

    I agree to a certain extent. Look at Josh Dobbs, he has an aerospace engineering degree. And I know he probably put in more hours than any player at UT.

    He's not saying it's not possible. He's saying why are athletics at this level and education at this level tied to the hip, it makes no sense. And when you step back and think about it, it doesn't make sense.

    You would never ask an expert computer programmer to go walk on the GT football team to go on to their profession, so why are star athletes supposed to go share classrooms with them?

  • donmdonm Posts: 10,241 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @KingoftheSouth said:

    @Acrum21 said:

    @KingoftheSouth said:
    Please read the article before anyone comments. There's a lot of cherry picking of quotes going on today with this interview.

    I honestly don't have any problem with what he said and thing he made some very valid points about the football institutions.

    I agree to a certain extent. Look at Josh Dobbs, he has an aerospace engineering degree. And I know he probably put in more hours than any player at UT.

    He's not saying it's not possible. He's saying why are athletics at this level and education at this level tied to the hip, it makes no sense. And when you step back and think about it, it doesn't make sense.

    You would never ask an expert computer programmer to go walk on the GT football team to go on to their profession, so why are star athletes supposed to go share classrooms with them?

    KOS - I think what happens to non-star athletes is more important. The stars will thrive at the next level. Not all but many. What about the others of whom there are far more? If the complaint is "it's too hard..it takes too much time"..then it seems like whining to me. Maybe we need a minor league for FB so guys like Rosen won't be so overworked. Seems like he wants cake and to eat it too. Theoretically FB can only require 20 hrs/week per NCAA rules. If his school requires more he gets to decide how important athletics is for him. I'm not all sympathetic to his case.

  • ladawgladawg Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    He's 20 years old.. what did any of us really know about such a complicated problem at 20! He is making an emotional statement because he feels entitled to do so... I worked 30 hours a week in college.. he has tutors, coaches texting him about where to be, etc... I think Rosen just has a big mouth.. I live in la, my wife is a ucla grad.. my house is a dawg and bruin household, but Rosen makes me cringe a little here

  • ladawgladawg Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Also, school is not a full time job..most the kids take 5 years, and go to school year round, so that's only 6-9 credits a semester.. that's 9 hours a week, plus 2-4 hours of studying.. that's not a full time job

  • ladawgladawg Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    I do think athletes should get more benefits, and a stipend say 5 grand a year..but millions of kids don't get to go to college because of money, thousands can't get into ucla because they have a 3.5 gpa in hs and not a 3.6.. and many of us go and leave w 50,000 dollars in debt.. these kids get a full ride to a great institution, get the opportunity and coaching of a lifetime, and now they think they not only should be paid, they shouldn't have to go to school... c'mon,

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Not sure what the point is in what he says. Is he saying that because he chooses to take a hard course he shouldn't have to play football or is he saying he shouldn't have to study because he is a football player? Either way he has/had a choice. He could have picked an easier course more friendly to his football development or taken his preferred course and not played football. Just seems a lot of woe is me when 90+% of kids his age would love to have the opportunity that he does.

  • Acrum21Acrum21 Posts: 2,436 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @KingoftheSouth said:
    He's not saying it's not possible. He's saying why are athletics at this level and education at this level tied to the hip, it makes no sense. And when you step back and think about it, it doesn't make sense.

    You would never ask an expert computer programmer to go walk on the GT football team to go on to their profession, so why are star athletes supposed to go share classrooms with them?

    The problem is there is not a real option to go to the NFL other than go through the NCAA. And I don't believe the NCAA has to change its rules regarding athletes that just want to go to the NFL and not "do school".

    The only real option I see is making it like basketball where you only have to play for a year to be eligible for the draft but that still wouldn't do good for 99.9% of the athletes.

    If there was a true Minor League for football or developmental league, the guys that just wanna play football can go do that.

  • ladawgladawg Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    I agree w you there.. but I also think the one and done is silly too.. if u play tennis, golf, baseball, bowling, poker, and are good enough to turn pro at 12 years old u can.. but basketball and football players can't.. hmmmmmm..

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @ladawg said:
    I do think athletes should get more benefits, and a stipend say 5 grand a year..but millions of kids don't get to go to college because of money, thousands can't get into ucla because they have a 3.5 gpa in hs and not a 3.6.. and many of us go and leave w 50,000 dollars in debt.. these kids get a full ride to a great institution, get the opportunity and coaching of a lifetime, and now they think they not only should be paid, they shouldn't have to go to school... c'mon,

    BTW, they do get a stipend on top of tuition, board, etc

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @Acrum21 said:

    @KingoftheSouth said:
    He's not saying it's not possible. He's saying why are athletics at this level and education at this level tied to the hip, it makes no sense. And when you step back and think about it, it doesn't make sense.

    You would never ask an expert computer programmer to go walk on the GT football team to go on to their profession, so why are star athletes supposed to go share classrooms with them?

    The problem is there is not a real option to go to the NFL other than go through the NCAA. And I don't believe the NCAA has to change its rules regarding athletes that just want to go to the NFL and not "do school".

    The only real option I see is making it like basketball where you only have to play for a year to be eligible for the draft but that still wouldn't do good for 99.9% of the athletes.

    If there was a true Minor League for football or developmental league, the guys that just wanna play football can go do that.

    But if that is his point why complain that he's not getting the chance for his MBA. Surely getting a degree however "easy" is better than going to college for 4 years and not getting one at all. Having no academic requirements would firstly make it a minor league and ultimately lead to the disassociation of football from college entirely. All college sports would be impacted as the cash cow dried up and every sport would become inter-mural.

  • donmdonm Posts: 10,241 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    And there are some who would applaud a totally intramural program. I'm not in that group. And I would favor a league for those who don't want to go to college at all. I'm not sure what college FB would look like if that happened.

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @donm said:
    And there are some who would applaud a totally intramural program. I'm not in that group. And I would favor a league for those who don't want to go to college at all. I'm not sure what college FB would look like if that happened.

    Most of the best players would take the "Minor League" route and even TWLOCP featuring 3rd/4th string talent wouldn't attract the crowds nor the TV money. CFB would die within 3 years and all other sports would lose funding and follow suit.

  • Acrum21Acrum21 Posts: 2,436 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    I don't think college sports would die at all. It works great for baseball. Some kids would still be smart enough to take the scholarship and the education. Once they sign that pro contract they can't come play college if it doesn't work out.

    Unless you think folks would watch the minor league games, unlike baseball, then there would absolutely still be a market for college football.

  • britishdawgbritishdawg Posts: 106 ✭✭✭ Junior

    I think one of the big challenges is that a lot of college athletes have no idea how hard it is to make the NFL. All of them think that they can do it, but only 1% of players actually make it. Rosen is a special talent, but he's one of the very few who has that future in front of him. One of the main reasons I'm ok with the NFL requiring 3 years rather than 1 is that 99% of college players are not going to ever get paid to play football. They need to get a degree and graduate.

    It's tough because college football is such a huge deal now. 100,000 people in the stadiums, billion dollar TV deals, all the players think they're going to be in that 1%. Heck, watching that 'Last Chance U' show, all the guys at JUCO think they're going to play in the NFL. To be honest, I really think that coaches and schools that don't do their best to help their players realize that they NEED to graduate are failing in their duty to these kids.

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    OK I read the interview(had previously read the article as suggested). The only thing that I learn't was that he thinks a lot of top recruits shouldn't be in school and/or the entire university schedule needs to revolve around the football schedule. It reinforces my thought that he has an elitist mentality.

  • ladawgladawg Posts: 1,369 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    I wish the silly 'elitist' talk would stop.. how about entitled.. saying elitist at this point would be the same as Rosen calling all of us sec folks hillbillies and rednecks.. I live in 'elitist' land in Hollywood.. I've lived in Georgia and in Houston and grew up in Hicksville upstate New York.people are opinionated everywhere.. . if that opinion is 'elitist' what is saban's comment about his qb transferring 'if I ever quit anything in my life, my daddy wouldn't let me in the house'... I just think that word is overused now and really has a subtext because he's from California.. and it also started from people calling the media elite and New Yorkers elite, when what they originally meant was 'jewish'.. which Rosen is.. so u don't make yourself sound good at all.. BA made the same comment on sec country live today, and we all know what the subtext is, so just stop.,

  • Denmen185Denmen185 Posts: 6,406 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Sorry ladawg, not sure where you're coming from on this one. The word elite originated from 18th century French and has zero to do with Jewish. Where I come from the word elitist is synonymous with snob which means thinking that they are superior to others. That is exactly what I took from the article. We agree on most things and I certainly respect your opinions but I have to disagree on this point. Let's just agree to disagree and move on.

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