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Covid-19

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Comments

  • CTDawgCTDawg Posts: 2,107 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    So, presented the following two options:

    A) Treat this as an actual threat, because people are getting sick and dying overseas and now domestically, and take measures to prevent the spread

    B) Treat this as if nothing is wrong and risk the deaths of thousands of more people just to prevent a month or two of economic regression

    You're choosing B?

  • RxDawgRxDawg Posts: 2,617 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    It's going to spread. It will be mild for most, severe for a few. The prevention tactics, and possibly the warmer weather may help. That is all.

  • DogsNotDawgsDogsNotDawgs Posts: 1,700 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Hope at least the vacation to Maine still works out. Doesn’t seem like a bad place to be at a time like this

  • lmiked7lmiked7 Posts: 144 ✭✭✭✭ Senior

    I think we can still treat something as a threat without shutting everything down. Maybe I'm wrong and all of this is preventing hundreds of millions of infections and millions of deaths. Thankfully I'm not the one that has to make those decisions but it seems silly to shut down schools and talk of cancelling sporting events when 120K have been infected globally over 2.5 months.

    Especially in the US when there are like 500 confirmed cases. Surely there has to be a middle ground between mass panic and completely ignoring everything.

  • pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 11,533 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate
  • christopheruleschristopherules Posts: 9,705 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate
    edited March 2020

    I don't know much, but I know that I woke up today. I am grateful for today.

  • pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 11,533 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate
  • UGA_2019UGA_2019 Posts: 157 ✭✭✭ Junior

    If you’d actually bothered to read the sources I posted, you would know that deaths and infections aren’t the only concern here. Our healthcare infrastructure is built to barely carry us through flu season.

    Bottom line is, we don’t have enough beds, nurses, doctors, or even test kits at this point. I very much hope that this turns out to be nothing, but that’s likely wishful thinking. If you’ve kept up with how infectious this thing is (twice as much as the flu) and how quickly it’s spread in other countries, you’d know too.

    Here’s a scientific study that shows that social distancing (self-quarantines) works, based on data from the 1918 influenza pandemic. I know you won’t read it, but it’s more for those non-ostriches out there:

    Here’s an excerpt from the article’s conclusion, to increase chances it gets through your thick skull:

    “Nonpharmaceutical interventions were grouped into 3 major categories: school closure; cancellation of public gatherings; and isolation and quarantine.

    These findings demonstrate a strong association between early, sustained, and layered application of nonpharmaceutical interventions and mitigating the consequences of the 1918-1919 influenza pandemic in the United States. In planning for future severe influenza pandemics, nonpharmaceutical interventions should be considered for inclusion as companion measures to developing effective vaccines and medications for prophylaxis and treatment.”

  • UGA_2019UGA_2019 Posts: 157 ✭✭✭ Junior

    Side note to go with the conclusion: this is a novel virus, meaning it’s never been seen in humans before therefore no one has any resistance (like some may have with a flu strain they’ve had previously)

    This also means that there is currently no vaccine. The virus has already mutated at least once, and could do so again and again, making vaccines less effective and potentially making the mutated virus more deadly. Something to think about for those who are capable

  • GradyDawg85GradyDawg85 Posts: 289 ✭✭✭✭ Senior

    Call this what you will, the WHO just declared this a pandemic.



  • CTDawgCTDawg Posts: 2,107 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Right, it's far far worse than Ebola in terms of ability to spread and ability to infect larger populations.

    The Ebola outbreak went on for three years but it was confined to a few specific regions in Africa and didn't make any headway in Europe or the U.S.

  • CTDawgCTDawg Posts: 2,107 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Yo why are you bringing facts, knowledge, and well-formulated opinions up in here? I'll just go about my life and if people get sick and die, oh freaking well I guess.

    /s in case you didn't know

This discussion has been closed.