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Now that NIL has consumed the collegiate level…

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    PerroGrandePerroGrande Posts: 6,130 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    They can do that in the pros now. That has been a criticism in the past that teams with a big population/TV base have an advantage and they can pay their players more. The rich get richer. But, at the end of the day, why is your hypothetical dealership paying the kid? Because they think he is good and they want him on the team and they are willing to pay for his potential marketing power. BTW, the marketing power of CFB players is profound, imho. Kids all over the region look up to them. If you have the marketing power, it will result in big contracts in a free market. Like I said, sea change. Adjustments are required.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    At the big schools, the boosters wield an almost unlimited amount of money. Think of a school like Texas. How many boosters in that state would gladly offer ANY player a free car and a bag of money if they thought the player added value to the program or if they though the player could add marketing value to their company. They were doing it already under the table without any publicity. How much more will they be willing to pony-up if they can now actually use that player in marketing? I just used the car dealership thing as an example. It could be the local beer distributor, or paper mill or tech company. There is already a basketball player with a $2M NIL deal with a web app company. Yes, the rich will get richer...especially the big market teams.

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    PerroGrandePerroGrande Posts: 6,130 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate
    edited August 2021

    NIL will figure into CFB moving forward, no doubt. That's why I keep saying sea change; it's huge. UGA better think a lot about the implications. Saban obviously understands based on his recent comments. Yes, some guys might want to go to a place where they think they will be in the spotlight winning Natty's, just like it is now, but being a star at a school with a great marketing base (and some big Mercedes dealership boosters) could be a much better move than being a bench warmer at Bama or UGA. So in this weird universe of unintended consequences, this could actually be a leveler. But, you are correct in your feeling imo--nobody knows exactly where this will lead. The one thing I'm sure of is that CFB players are going to make a lot of money as long as fans continue to love the game like they do now. I know a lot of people (myself included) who like CFB more than the NFL. They could end up getting paid comparably for NIL.

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    KaseyKasey Posts: 28,889 mod

    It’s cute none of you think this hasn’t been happening already.

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    TeddyTeddy Posts: 7,109 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    So, let's say they get $50k and a car, equaling roughly a $100k. The tuition, books, and housing covered by scholarship is about $20k. If you were making $50k with a free car, would you turn down $20k in scholarship/benefits and just donate it to someone lower on the totem pole in your line of work? I doubt you would pass on a 20% raise at your work if offered one and tell your company to donate it to someone else.

    Your theory only applies to the mega-NIL deals. Which will be few and far between. Maybe reserved only for the QBs of Bama, OSU, UGA and a couple of others. Also, very unlikely that 7 figure deals will be signed for a kid that hasn't even stepped foot on a college football field. Think if we paid Eason, Cox, etc. big money to sign 5 star talent. What a waste that would be, making those that fund NIL deals hesitant to sign big contracts on unproven players. Thus, they would need to be on scholarship a year or two before they make the big bucks to even think about "donating" their scholarship to someone else.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    That's exactly what I said. If you go back and look I was pretty clear about it really only applying to guys with the mega-deals. Many of these players are going to have multiple NIL deals going on. If a star decides to give up a scholarship it would be very easy for someone to simply tack on a small local NIL deal to cover the difference. But in reality it could be anyone. Other than the prestige of being "on scholarship", what's the difference between having an official scholarship and some booster agreeing to just pay for everything?

    And what does the booster get out of it? Prestige, access, maybe some marketing. How much is a box worth at Bryant-Denny Stadium or Sanford or the Rose Bowl? I used to work for a company that was owned by the grandson of Bear Bryant. You better believe they used that to their advantage. MANY of our big customers got free tickets to games. We would get calls all the time from clients "Hey, I need 4 tickets to the Iron Bowl"...and the boss would get them. Officially sold out, but we could get them. That's what boosters get out of it. They turn around and take their big clients to big games, maybe get sideline passes or seats at a boosters dinner.

    And how can you say it's unlikely that kids are going to get million dollar deals before even stepping on the field? We are almost there already only a few months into this. There's a basketball player at Tenn St, class of 2021 (Hercy Miller) who already has a $2M contract with Webb Apps America (whatever that is).

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    TeddyTeddy Posts: 7,109 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    You know Hercy is Master P's kid, right? Already had a big following online. So, it's not his talents getting him this deal, it's his name/dad. If I was Eminem's kid I bet I could get a $500k/yr. NIL deal too. The best ranking I could find for him is a 3 star, most have him unranked. Need a better example than Master P's kid. The biggest NIL deals so far have been players that already have huge online followings.

    Either way, if someone is willing to pay you an NIL deal, I still wouldn't give up a scholarship for it. If you're that good, you're worth a scholarship and the NIL money.

    And since we're playing every "what if" scenario... What happens if a kid get injured and never returns to form? They'll wish they had both the NIL and scholarship (especially since they'll now need a degree, since NFL aspirations are over for them). Their NIL deal could be dropped based on contract language, then they're without scholarship and a NIL deal.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Don't care who he is. He's a college athlete with a $2M NIL deal without even stepping foot on court. He won't be the last. Nor will he be the outlier of college kids with multi-million dollar contracts. There is nothing saying a kid can't have dozens of NIL deals. I'll bet JT lands a few more deals before the season is over. These kids could be making more than most NFL players with a good 3-4 year run in college.

    Scholarships are only one-year deals. If a kid gets injured and can't play he loses his scholarship. I am not aware of any scholarships that are guaranteed for 4 years. If he's a high character guy maybe he keeps his NIL deal. The only good thing I see with the NIL is that it might encourage kids to behave a little better. These kids who do drugs, smack their girls around, steal stuff, and all the other nonsense that some players get involved in...it could mean the loss of a lot of money in sponsorships. Getting that sweet Milo's Ice Tea NIL deal probably comes with a lot of conduct amendments.

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    BumBum Posts: 2,340 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    @pgjackson I think you will be proven right in due time. “

    “You coming to Athens my dude? Winning a championship brings the $$$, my man I’ll give you my scholarship and a cut of my NIL. scholarship money man that’s chump change bro 😎 after we get this natty I doubling my NIL rate, we both rich!” 💵 ✅ 💯

    -future Dawg we all love.

    an example of a business deal on Twitter. What could go wrong?

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    Joe31Joe31 Posts: 1,345 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Hmmm….. I wasn’t aware scholarships had to be renewed annually. Makes sense, just never thought of that.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Yep! Once this gets rolling, if there aren't any NCAA rules in place it is going to be a big mess.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Yep. Back in the CMR years, he was famous for retaining injured players on scholarship. It was a great humanitarian gesture, but ultimately it resulted in us having fewer actual scholarship athletes on the roster than our rivals. If I remember correctly I think at one point we only had like 75 scholarship athletes on the team.

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    TeddyTeddy Posts: 7,109 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Ok, you don’t care that it’s Master P’s kid, totally legit example of what 3 stars can expect to make.

    Also, if you’re medically DQ’d you get to keep your scholarship and you don’t count against your team’s scholarship totals. So, you making all that up about losing your scholarship is completely false, and proves you’ll say anything to try to make a point, even if false. Schools will honor their scholarship until they graduate or if they flunk out. Not a very good recruiting pitch if you don’t let an injured kid get his degree.

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    Joe31Joe31 Posts: 1,345 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Come think of it I think I do remember reading of peoples’ consternation regarding this way back. Very humanitarian but also very costly.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate
    edited August 2021

    You are going to have to show me where a scholarship is guaranteed. Players get cut all the time. Not aware of a medical exclusion that guarantees 4 years. If I'm wrong about that, fine. But scholarships are generally a one year agreement. Some schools can offer multi-year deals if they want, but it's not the norm.


    https://usatodayhss.com/2019/ncsa-are-athletic-scholarships-guaranteed-for-four-years

    https://www.athleticscholarships.net/question/how-long-does-my-athletic-scholarship-last

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    TeddyTeddy Posts: 7,109 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Didn’t say scholarships were guaranteed, said there’s this thing called medical DQ (technically called a medical exemption)…Have you ever heard of Marshall Long? He punted for UGA just a few of years ago, medically DQ’d.

    Do you think these schools with endless resources are going to leave players out to dry? What a recruiting pitch that would be. “Hey, you got hurt and ended your playing career, kick rocks.” I’m sure kids will be lining up to play a violent sport like football with that pitch.

    So, as long as the AD doesn’t mind paying they can stay their four years. I’m sure UGA and all big NIL schools athletic departments can afford to let a kid or two graduate after career ending injuries.

    Side note, while looking the rules up, a story about Bama using medical exemptions 12 times more often than the SEC average. Talking about how they’ll medically exempt a player and just pay for the remainder of their school years.

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    pgjacksonpgjackson Posts: 17,781 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Ok, fine. It's still not guaranteed, but whatever. Has nothing to do with my original point that scholarships are generally one-year deals and they can be revoked for many reasons...medical stuff is one of them. P5 football teams are allowed to give multi-year scholarships if they choose, but it's not necessarily the norm. Not sure why you are so defensive of this or are accusing me of just making stuff up to prove a point. I provided two links on the topic.

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    Joe31Joe31 Posts: 1,345 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Yeah, that being the case, there is no way I would attend a school that didn’t cover that if I were a recruit.

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    TeddyTeddy Posts: 7,109 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    The original point is that suffering a career ending injury, you can kiss your NIL $$$ goodbye. Where as a scholarship at a morally sound school will get you a degree in the off chance you suffer a career ending injury. So, in this instance a scholarship/degree is quite valuable and shouldn't be given up. As that degree will be how you make your living the rest of your life.

    Either way, there won't be a ton of seven figure deals for kids graduating high school. The only big ones, who haven't done anything on the field are Master P's kid and some big TikTokers/YouTubers/social media, The latter being kids with a skill they should be able to profit from whether they are an NCAA athlete or not.

    Big deals for say JT is because he's actually shown promise on the field. I'd start a GoFundMe for way more than 7 figures if he and the other players brought UGA a championship. 😂

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    donmedeirosdonmedeiros Posts: 3,379 ✭✭✭✭✭ Graduate

    Has anyone actually seen one of these NIL type contracts ? What conditions need to be met for a kid to make "7 figures" ? Are there performance bonuses ? Do sales of his sponsor's products have to show an increase for him to make "more" money ? What happens if he gets injured and misses games ? When I hear phrases like "could be worth up to...." I get a little suspicious. I wonder if there is guaranteed money up front, or if it is more backloaded.

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